All Posts tagged Kid’s Vision

Back to School Exams

Back to School Exams

August has arrived and with it, back to school shopping lists. One of the most important things you can add to your back to school to-do list is a comprehensive eye exam for the kids, and for yourself.

For many folks, a physical exam is required before school starts. Your family doctor may do a vision screening, but that is not sufficient to asses your child’s near vision as screenings typically only asses distance vision.

Kids spend a lot of their time looking at near objects like textbooks, iPads, and laptops. Near vision struggles can make kids uncomfortable staying focused on near sight required tasks – this can result in a decreased desire to read, poor handwriting skills and trouble focusing.

A comprehensive eye exam done by your family’s eye doctor will help to make sure your child has sufficient near vision and isn’t struggling. And your eye doctor will also be able to identify other vision problems that may impede learning.

To schedule an appointment for a back to school eye exam for your child, click here.

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3 Back to School Vision Problems

3 Back to School Vision Problems

The kiddos have been back in school for a little while now and as such, it is the ideal time to start monitoring for vision problems.

Here are a few important things to watch out for during the school year, as these issues may help you identify a vision problem. If you are noticing any of these issues, schedule an appointment with your eye doctor for a comprehensive eye exam for your child.

  1. One out of four kids have an undetected vision problem. 
    Believe or it not, vision problems in childhood are very common and nothing to be alarmed about. While you may have visited your pediatrician and passed a simple vision screening, those screenings don’t always detect larger vision problems. A visit to your eye doctor for a comprehensive exam is the only way to fully assess vision health.
  2. Reading & Writing
    Is your child using their finger to help them follow along with reading and writing? Are they mixing up words? Do they complain of the words “doubling” while they read? Yes, some of these issues could be a learning disorder – but the first place to start is with their vision. Often their eyes are not working well together and a comprehensive exam can help us determine if that’s the case.
  3. Overuse of Digital Devices
    Kids are using digital devices in school and at home. The blue light emitted from these devices can cause what’s called digital eye strain. Symptoms of digital eye strain include dry, scratchy eyes, blurred vision, headaches, and fatigued eyes. An eye exam can help us confirm digital eye strain and we can get your child outfitted with lenses that protect against and filter out the damaging blue light – with or without a prescription.

If you notice your child experiencing any issues like trouble reading or writing, complaining of double vision, dry, scratchy or irritated eyes – schedule an appointment with your eye doctor for a comprehensive exam.

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10 Years of InfantSEE

10 Years of InfantSEE

We are proud to take part in the InfantSEE program, which turns 10 years old today!

Here at ey2eye, Dr. Doan participates in the InfantSEE program, where she provides free vision screenings for infants 6-12 months of age. We wanted to share with you a few of the great benefits of this program on the blog today.

The American Optometric Association recommends scheduling your baby’s first eye assessment at 6 months of age. When you come in for  your visit, Dr. Doan will test for a few of the following things:

  • excessive or unequal amounts of nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism
  • eye movement ability
  • eye health problems

While these problems are not common, early screening and detection makes it much easier to treat any vision problems. The goal of the InfantSEE program is to ensure that eye and vision care becomes an essential part of infant wellness care to improve a child’s quality of life. Research shows that at 6 months of age, many of a baby’s vision functions are fully developed, making this the perfect time to get their vision and eye health screened.

You can learn more about our InfantSEE services here.

Happy Birthday, InfantSEE!

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Pediatric Glasses

Pediatric Glasses

You may have heard about our InfantSEE program – a nation vision program for infants. At as early as six months of age, we will test your little one for: excessive or unequal amounts of nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism, eye movement ability and other eye health problems.

Your child should have their first eye exam by the age of one. For more information about children’s vision and what to look for, click here.

Once you’ve had your child’s first exam, it may be determined that they need glasses. Have no fear – there are incredible pediatric eyewear options out there – including Miraflex, an unbreakable frame for infants, toddlers and kids.

Here is an amazing video we took at the International Vision Expo last month of Miraflex frames in action.

Miraflex frames are amazing! If you think your child could benefit from frames this flexible, make an appointment to come see us.

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Show Us Your Valentine

Show Us Your Valentine

Hey Parents! Bringing your little one to your appointment this week? Have them bring along the valentine they made for you and they’ll receive a special sweet treat just for them.

We love our eye2eye families! Watching the kiddos grow, graduate, helping you through each phase of your eye care needs.

Happy Valentine’s Day from eye2eye!

Not scheduled for an appointment this week? We still have a few openings, make one here.

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Kids & Digital Devices

Kids & Digital Devices

With back to school on all of our brains, now is great time to talk kids and digital devices. As parents, we all try to limit our child’s time using digital devices like computers, tablets and smartphones. But sometimes time adds up quickly and kids end up spending more time than we think on their devices.

In a recent poll conducted by the American Optometric Association, 83% percent of kids said that they use their device more than 3 hours a day – compared to only 40% of parents polled who said their children use their digital devices more than 3 hours a day. What does this mean? Kids use their devices more than parents think!

Eighty percent of kids said they experience burning, itchy or tired eyes after using their devices for long periods of time.

So, how to prevent this? Make sure your kiddos use the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. This gives the eyes a break and helps to prevent strain.

Check out the infographic above, created by the American Optometric Association.

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FAQ: Sports Eyewear

FAQ: Sports Eyewear

As spring nears many kids are signing up for spring sports – soccer, baseball, field hockey – you name it, the season for outdoor sports is almost upon us.

Many parents come to Dr. A with questions regarding their glasses-wearing children and sports. Coaches will often recommend that children wear sports goggles and not their glasses during play for safety reasons. Dr. A does agrees with these recommendations, but their are other options for your child.

We offer a a great selection of sports goggles to meet your child’s needs, but if you are looking an alternative – we have fit contact lenses for kids as young as 9 or 10. Whether or not your child is eligible for sports contact lenses will depend on several factors such as their particular prescription, maturity and activity.

If your child does choose to wear contact lenses for athletics, we would recommend single-use, disposable contact lenses worn only for practice and games. To find out if your child is a good candidate for sports contact lenses, schedule an exam with us. We’ll exam their vision and review options for athletic eyewear!

If you are interested in protective athletic eyewear, here is some important information to consider from AllAboutVision.com:

What to Look for in Protective Eyewear:
– Lenses in sports eyewear usually are made of polycarbonate. Since polycarbonate is such an impact-resistant lens material, it works well to protect eyes from fast-moving objects. Polycarbonate also has built-in ultraviolet protection — a valuable feature for outdoor sports.
– Most sport frames can accommodate both prescription and nonprescription lenses. Sport frames are constructed of highly impact-resistant plastic or polycarbonate, and most come with rubber padding to cushion the frame where it comes in contact with the head or the nose area.
– Some sports styles are contoured, wrapping slightly around the face. This type of goggle works well for biking, hang-gliding and sailing. Contact lens wearers especially benefit from the wraparound style, as it helps keep out wind and dust.
– Sports goggles are made in a variety of shapes and sizes. Many are designed for racquet sports and are available for basketball and soccer. Some are even designed to fit in helmets used for football, hockey and baseball. Sports goggles should allow the use of helmets when the sport calls for it.

As the spring sports season arrives – let us help you navigate ways to protect your child’s eyes! Click here to make an appointment for a comprehensive exam!

Source: AllAboutVision.com

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