All Posts tagged Dr. A’s Tips

6 Ways to Fight Spring Allergies

6 Ways to Fight Spring Allergies

1.) Preventing & treating itchy, watery eyes. 

-Always wash hands and face after coming in from outdoors, be sure to take frequent showers to remove pollen.

-Wash hair more often as pollen can linger in your hair and when you lie down on your pillow or couch, your face can rub around in it, exposing you to more of the allergens.

-Replace old makeup and use an applicator instead of fingers to prevent pollen contamination.

-There are great prescription eye drops you may use once a day to reduce and/or limit eye allergies. Contact lens wearers may still wear contacts if they wait 10 minutes after inserting the drops.

2.) Start taking your oral allergy medication now. 

– The sooner you start taking your oral allergy medication, the better. Ideally, just before or once the pollen count starts to creep up, then one should start taking their oral allergy medicine as well as their allergy eye drops.

-People new to the area might  feel that they have a cold, and after 1-2 years, they realize the pattern – its allergies! Again, the earlier the better when starting treatment!

 3.) Switch to single use contact lenses during allergy season.

-Use one day disposable contacts during allergy season so that you insert a fresh, pollen free lens each day. This will greatly reduce your symptoms and keep your eyes itch-free.

-For those who have moderate to severe allergies, discontinuing contact lenses when the pollen is at its peak cuts down on the pollen “sticking” on the lens and staying on the eye all day. If using single use lenses is not reducing your symptoms, switching to glasses during peak season may be a better choice.

5.) Warning signs of something more serious. 

If you have pain, decreased vision, or redness that gets worse, it could be signs of other eye issues and you should see the doctor right away.

6.) What about the kiddos?

 -Be sure to encourage kids to wash their hands and face after recess or coming in from outdoors.

-Have them change their clothes when they return home for the day.

-Keep bedroom windows closed during peak pollen days.

-Change pillow case if kids did not wash hair that day.

-Discuss with their pediatrician options for treating their overall allergy symptoms, like taking an oral allergy pill.

Establishing the cause and having a doctor manage your eye allergies will help make sure you suffer less, click here to make an appointment with the doctors at eye2eye. 

Image source

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Halloween Eye Safety

Halloween Eye Safety

Happy Halloween! We hope you have a safe and happy Halloween! In the spirit of the holiday, we want to share a few tips for keeping your peepers safe while haunting this evening.

1. Halloween Costume Contact Lenses
While they can make a great addition to your Halloween costume, they pose serious risks to your vision. These lenses are decorative and meant to make changes to color of your eyes. You may see them in different colors, or they look like vampire, werewolf or witch eyes. But, beware, non prescription sale of contact lenses is illegal – and if they are purchased anywhere except from a licensed eye care professional they can cause serious damage. “Non-prescription costume contacts can cause injuries such as cuts and open sores in the protective layer of the iris and pupil and potentially blinding painful bacterial infections. These injuries can require serious eye surgeries such as corneal transplants, and in some cases lead to permanent vision loss” (source). Be safe and say no to novelty contact lenses this Halloween – unless of course, you purchased them from an eye care professional.
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2. Halloween Makeup 
Halloween makeup can make a costume extra scary – follow these tips for application and removal to make sure your peepers stay safe.
– Only use makeup products that are approved for use on skin.
– Keep makeup away from the eye area.
– Use caution when removing makeup so as not to get it in the eyes. Use a safe eye makeup remover for the eye area and mild soap to remove from your face.
– Don’t share your makeup and be sure to wash brushes and applicators!
– Use extra caution when applying false eyelashes – only apply them according to package instructions and do not dye your eyelashes or eyebrows, there are no FDA approved eyelash or eyebrow dyes.
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3. Pointy Objects & Costumes
Exercise extra caution with pointy objects – like plastic pirate swords and costume elements. Make sure kiddos understand to keep them low to the ground and never to point them in people’s faces. If costumes have masks or hats – make sure they are secure and not at risk of poking you in the eye!
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Sports Vision Safety Month

Sports Vision Safety Month

April is National Sports Vision Safety Month & it couldn’t be a more important topic to discuss as the spring sports season is well underway. Many sports pose serious risks to eyes and vision – but the top three most dangerous? Baseball, martial arts and basketball.

There are over 100,000 sports-related eye injuries per year, 42,000 of them end up in the ER and 13,500 of those injured go blind – 90% of these are preventable injuries by using proper eyewear.

The average cost of a basketball eye injury for a child under 15 is $3,996 – you could save over $3,00, and most likely more, by purchasing proper protective sports eyewear for your child.

To learn more about protective eyewear, schedule an appointment – we can help you discuss the best options for your child as well as fit them for protective gear.

For more info, browse the easy reference guide below.

A few great resources for information about how to keep your vision safe during sports activities:
1. AOA
2. All About Vision
3. Get Eye Smart
4. NIH

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*Source: http://www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/living/sports-eye-injuries-infographic.cfm

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Save Your Vision Month

Save Your Vision Month

March is National Save Your Vision Month. Sponsored by Optometry Cares, a foundation run by the American Optometric Association.

In honor of this month dedicated to raising awareness about how to practice healthy vision habits – we thought we would roundup some our best advice from Dr. A to help you maintain healthy vision through all stages of life.

1. InfantSee – This program at eye2eye provides free vision screenings for infants. Learn more about what to look out for in each month of your child’s first year of life regarding vision development, click here to see more.

2. Kids’ Vision & Better Grades – In this blog post, we discuss what to look out for with your child’s vision once they reach school age, when to schedule their first full eye exam and more.

3. Sun Safety Tips for Kids & Teens – In this blog post, you’ll learn how to protect your child’s eyes from UV damage. Also check out this post about how to select the best pair of sunglasses for your child.

4. UV Damage in the Winter MonthsThis post delves into the risks of not using proper UV protection in the winter months, as well as why its just as important to rock shades in the winter as it is the summer.

5. Family History & Preventative CareLearn about why it’s important to know your family history as it relates to vision health.

6. Five Easy Steps to Healthier Vision – Need a quick go-to guide for easy ways to support healthy vision? This post has 5 easy tips.

7. Summer Safety TipsLearn about UV protection in the summer months and why it’s so important to have a good pair of sunglasses.

8. Eat For Eye Health – This post covers delicious ways to support eye health – eye-friendly foods!

9. Ease Dry Eyes – Dry eyes can be uncomfortable & lead to vision issues, learn how to ease them here.

10. Glaucoma RiskLearn if you are in a high risk category for glaucoma.

11. A 21st Century Issue: Digital Eye Strain – With the mobile technology becoming an ever-increasing part of our lives, risks to your vision and overall health are posed. Learn about digital eye strain in this post as well as this one.

12. Computer GlassesProtect your eyes while logging hours in front of your computer.

13. What’s in an Eye Exam?This post is possibly the most important of all – learn what goes into a comprehensive eye exam and why they are crucial to healthy vision.

14. Macular Degeneration Testing – We now offer cutting edge testing that allows us to establish your baseline risk for macular degeneration. Learn more here.

To make an appointment to visit Dr. A or Dr. Doan, please click here.

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8 Tips to Ease Dry Eyes

8 Tips to Ease Dry Eyes


1. Use artificial tears – Preservative free artificial tear supplements are available. You want to choose a preservative free supplement in order to minimize your exposure to preservatives since you will be using the drops 2 or more times a day.

2. The 20/20/20 rule – When working on the computer or reading, every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Computer use and reading decrease your blink rate and the surface of your eye dries out faster than normal.

3. Use a humidifier – Add a humidifier near your desk at work and near your bed at home. At work, this will help alleviate some of the drier air you get in large office settings and even older buildings. At night, a humidifier would help because  Sometimes your eyelids may not close all the way while sleeping and the exposed surface will dry out faster. A humidifier helps to keep your eyes moist throughout the night.

4. Single use contacts – If you are a contact lens-wearer, decrease your wear time in your contact lenses. Your days of over-wearing your contact lenses are over…If you want to stay a happy, comfortable wearer, take out lenses earlier and wear your glasses. Give your eyes more of a break!  The best solution?  Single use contacts-what feels better than a clean, fresh lens on your eye each day?

5. Visit your eye doctor – Your eye doctor can make sure that there isn’t a larger problem at hand. They can also prescribe eye drops not available over the counter.

6. Diet – Improving your diet. Increase your intake of salmon, tuna, walnuts and flaxseed. They are all great sources of Omega-3 fatty acids. You may also take an Omega-3 supplement. Ask your doctor which supplement would be best for you.

7. Proper lid hygiene – Properly cleaning your eyelids helps to make sure that your tear ducts aren’t blocked – if they are blocked they can’t secrete the tears your eyes need to remain lubricated. While in the shower, use warm soapy water or a clean washcloth to gently clean your lids and eyelashes. Ladies, you have to get that makeup off at the end of the day!

8. Stay hydrated – Drinking plenty of water throughout the day will help ensure you are well hydrated.

If you are experiencing dry eyes and are looking for relief, schedule an appointment here. We can help you establish the cause of your dry eyes, and help you implement a wellness strategy to improve them.

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Eat for your Eye Health

Eat for your Eye Health

February is Age-Related Macular Degeneration Awareness Month. The good news about AMD is that there are many ways which we can combat its onset – including making changes to our diets. Do you have a family history of AMD? You may want to consider macular pigment testing, to help determine your risk – also annual comprehensive eye exams are crucial.

Even if you are not at risk for developing AMD – you can incorporate some wonderful foods into your diet that support overall eye and vision health. Watch our video below to find out which foods are best for feeding your eyes.

The carotenoids lutein (pronounced loo-teen) and zeaxanthin (pronounced zee-uhzan-thin), which are antioxidants and the only carotenoids located in the eye, may protect against cataracts and AMD.

One of the first large studies on carotenoids is the Eye Disease Case Control Study, in which diet was compared to the risk for developing AMD. Results found a significantly lower risk for developing the eye disease in people with high amounts of lutein+zeaxanthin in their blood. Also, those people eating a diet with the most lutein+zeaxanthin (as much as 5.8 milligrams (mg) per day) had a significantly lower risk for AMD than those whose diet contained the least amount (as low as 1.2 mg per day). Dietary studies confirmed the association between frequent consumption of spinach or collard greens, particularly good sources of lutein and zeaxanthin, and lower AMD risk. (source)

For more information about these AMD fighting antioxidants, click here.

To schedule an appointment to determine your risk for AMD or to schedule your annual exam, click here.

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What You Should Know About Digital Eye Strain

What You Should Know About Digital Eye Strain

Several months ago, The Vision Council released a report stating that nearly 70% of US adults experience digital eye strain while using digital devices like computers, tablets and smartphones.

Digital eye strain is defined as the physical discomfort experienced after two or more hours of staring at a screen. You might experience symptoms like dry, red or irritated eyes, blurred vision, fatigued eyes and back, neck or shoulder pain. You may also experience headaches. The symptoms of digital eye strain are not permanent and should dissipate after you discontinue use of digital devices. But, there could be long term damage as a result of digital eye strain.

The strain that focusing on mid-range digital screens causes our eyes tires the eye’s focusing system, causing possible long term damage. Another damaging element of digital eye strain and digital devices is the high-energy visible (HEV) or blue light emitted by these devices. Research suggests that overexposure to HEV light can damage the retina and increase the likelihood and severity of eye disorders like age-related macular degeneration and cataracts (source).

The Vision Council finds that six in 10 adults are unaware of the harmful consequences of HEV light – chances are you may be one of them. Here’s what you should know and how you can help reduce the likelihood of the long term damaging effects of digital eye strain;

1. The optical industry has developed several technologies that help address the causes of digital eye strain. Computer glasses are designed for the mid-distance range of computer screens, and they help bring digital content into focus. Computer glasses can be combined with special lens coatings and tints to help reduce screen glare and block out harmful HEV and blue-violet light. 

2. Always be sure to use the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. 

3. Be sure your workstation is optimized for your eyes with proper lighting, seat adjustments and monitor settings. 

4. Enlarge your computer’s text, this can also be done on your smartphones and tablets. Enlarging the text helps to reduce strain. 

5. This may be the simplest thing you can do – remember to blink. Staring at computer screens can dry your eyes. If you think you may be suffering from chronic dry eyes – schedule an appointment and we can help you. 

If you spend a lot of your time behind the screen and find that you are suffering from the symptoms of digital eye strain, stop in and let Dr. A discuss options for how to help you. There are a wide range of options including computer glasses.

Click here to make an appointment at eye2eye Optometry Corner!

 

Source: The Vision Council

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Transitions Lenses

Transitions Lenses

Transitions lenses offer lots of flexibility and the protection and vision correction you need, 100% of the time. There are many benefits to choosing a Transitions lens – including consistent and proper UV protection and the ease of one pair of glasses versus two. In this post, Dr. A discusses her thoughts on Transitions lenses and why she likes and uses them for herself. For more information about Transitions lenses take a look at the video at the bottom of this post, it reviews all of the Transitions lenses choices and benefits.

Dr. A on Transitions Lenses:

The latest technology from Transitions lenses allows you lots of freedom and flexibility with your eyeglasses. Transitions lenses are lenses that react to UV light by getting darker when you go outside.

I find this helpful when I’m running errands like grocery shopping and don’t have free hands to switch to my prescription sunglasses. My glasses automatically turn dark when I go outside and turn clear when I go inside. I also find this most helpful when having to go in and out of buildings for meetings or errands and on overcast days when the light still bothers my eyes, but it is not bright enough to wear darker sunglasses.

Transitions lenses are also perfect for kids, you don’t have to worry about making sure they keep track of two pairs of glasses. It also ensures that they always have proper UV protection all of the time.

I consider Transitions lenses a great addition to my glasses that I already have to wear anyway and recommend them to any patient looking for a convenient and simple solution to prescription sunglasses.

Want to discuss Transitions lenses more or learn more about them? Drop us a note at info@myeye2eye.com or schedule an appointment!

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Early Allergies, Start Treating Them Now

Early Allergies, Start Treating Them Now

Well, this unexpected March snowstorm and crushing cold will definitely help curb the bloom for a few more days, but with the warmer days last week some of you may be feeling the effects of early allergy symptoms.

Now is the best time to start treating them, early treatment will help curb the overall severity of your symptoms. Below we discuss a few ways you can begin treating your allergies now, to help minimize the misery this season.

1.) Preventing & treating itchy, watery eyes. 

-Always wash hands and face after coming in from outdoors, be sure to take frequent showers to remove pollen.
-Wash hair more often as pollen can linger in your hair and when you lie down on your pillow or couch, your face can rub around in it, exposing you to more of the allergens.
-Replace old makeup and use an applicator instead of fingers to prevent pollen contamination.
-There are great prescription eye drops you may use once a day to reduce and/or limit eye allergies. Contact lens wearers may still wear contacts if they wait 10 minutes after inserting the drops.

2.) Start taking your oral allergy medication now. 

– The sooner you start taking your oral allergy medication, the better. Ideally, just before or once the pollen count starts to creep up, then one should start taking their oral allergy medicine as well as their allergy eye drops.
-People new to the area might  feel that they have a cold, and after 1-2 years, they realize the pattern – its allergies! Again, the earlier the better when starting treatment!

 3.) Switch to single use contact lenses during allergy season.

-Use one day disposable contacts during allergy season so that you insert a fresh, pollen free lens each day. This will greatly reduce your symptoms and keep your eyes itch-free.
-For those who have moderate to severe allergies, discontinuing contact lenses when the pollen is at its peak cuts down on the pollen “sticking” on the lens and staying on the eye all day. If using single use lenses is not reducing your symptoms, switching to glasses during peak season may be a better choice.

5.) Warning signs of something more serious. 

If you have pain, decreased vision, or redness that gets worse, it could be signs of other eye issues and you should see the doctor right away.

6.) What about the kiddos?

 -Be sure to encourage kids to wash their hands and face after recess or coming in from outdoors.
-Have them change their clothes when they return home for the day.
-Keep bedroom windows closed during peak pollen days.
-Change pillow case if kids did not wash hair that day.
-Discuss with their pediatrician options for treating their overall allergy symptoms, like taking an oral allergy pill.

As always, if you need to see the doctor for your allergy symptoms and treatment, click here to make an appointment!

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Menopause & Dry Eyes

Menopause & Dry Eyes

Did you know that about 61 percent of perimenopausal and menopausal women suffer from dry, itchy eyes — but only 16 percent of them realize that menopause is to blame? This according to the Society for Women’s Health Research.

If you are experiencing menopause and dry eye symptoms you may be left asking, what can you do about it?

First of all, we must correctly identify the symptoms of dry eyes: consistent dryness, blurred vision that fluctuates, light sensitivity, burning and a gritty sensation are the main symptoms to look out for. Excess tearing is also a symptom of dry eyes. People often confuse this with not having dry eyes, but the body is actually trying to compensate from the lack of moisture by producing more tears.

Once we’ve identified the symptoms and diagnosed dry eyes, we can discuss ways to manage the symptoms. Luckily there are several options for  finding relief and minimizing symptoms. Below we discuss a few options.

1. Preservative free artificial tear supplements. You want to choose a preservative free supplement in order to minimize your exposure to preservatives since you will be using the drops 2-3x per day.

2. The 20/20/20 rule. When working on the computer or reading, every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Computer use and reading decrease your blink rate and the surface of your eye dries out faster than normal.

3. Add a humidifier near your desk at work and near your bed at home. Sometimes your eyelids may not close all the way while sleeping and the exposed surface will dry out faster. A humidifier helps to keep your eyes moist throughout the night.

4. If you are a contact lens-wearer, decrease your wear time in your contact lenses. Your days of over-wearing your contact lenses are over…If you want to stay a happy, comfortable wearer, take out lenses earlier and wear your glasses. Give your eyes more of a break!

5. See your eye care professional for prescription eye drop options. Restasis is the only eye drop available on the market that stimulates your body to produce its own tears.

6. Improving your diet. Increase your intake of salmon, tuna, walnuts and flaxseed. They are all great sources of Omega-3 fatty acids. You may also take an Omega-3 supplement.

If you are suffering from dry eyes and think it may be related to menopause, make an appointment with us and we’ll help you navigate your options.

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